Latest Images
Latest Pictures
Apr
17
Posted by   Filed under Bates Motel, Events, Movies, PhotosComments Off

Thanks a lot to leslie-mann.com and sam-claflin.net I have added and replaced the old MQs with HQs from the Press Conference of Bates Motel.

Gallery link:
Public Appearances > Events in 2013 > “Bates Motel” Press Conference

Apr
03
Posted by   Filed under Media Alert, Movies, The Conjuring, TrailersComments Off

Mar
28
Posted by   Filed under Articles, Bates Motel, Interviews, MoviesComments Off

‘Bates Motel’ actress Vera Farmiga said her character, Norma, ‘knows something’ about her son Norman that makes her overly protective. ‘Bates Motel’ is a TV prequel to the seminal horror movie ‘Psycho.’

Vera Farmiga has some advice for Norma Bates, her character in the new series “Bates Motel”: “Honesty is always the best policy.”

Honesty — or the lack of it — is a key theme in the 10-episode prequel to the classic Hitchcock film “Psycho.” The A&E show, which premiered Monday at 10 p.m., reveals just what drove Norman Bates (Freddie Highmore) over the edge.

In an interview Monday, the Oscar-nominated actress said Norman and his mother, Norma, are “harboring a dark secret which will unfold as the series continues.” Along with the everyday angst most parents experience, Norma “knows something about him that I think makes her hyper-protective,” Farmiga said.

RECOMMENDED: Are you a TV trivia buff? Take our quiz

Farmiga didn’t have a lot to go from to create her character. In “Psycho,” Norman’s mother was a skeletal role. (Although Farmiga did reveal that in an upcoming episode she dons the same hairstyle as Norman’s mother from the original film.)

Farmiga, who has two toddlers of her own, said she studied hers and other maternal relationships around her to help her get into character. She says in her mind Norma is a mother who is trying to be a good influence.

“Yeah, she’s insane as any mother goes insane sometimes,” Farmiga said. “It’s a very typical portrayal of maternity and its function and dysfunction and its victories and defeats. She doesn’t always make the right decisions.”

The actress said she also looked to the theater, where she began her career, for inspiration in women in Chekhov and Ibsen plays.

“It just reminded me a lot of the heroines and the yearning to start over,” she said. “Our story is that: What lengths will a mother go to to give her child the life that she envisions for him?”

In the series, Norma Bates has another son, Dylan (Max Thieriot), with whom she says Norma “failed miserably.” That explains why her relationship with Norman is “so tightfisted, so entwined,” she said.

“You could say these two still have an umbilical cord like wrapped around the two of them and for an audience to decide and take that journey to decide how close is too close,” Farmiga said.

Anyone who has seen “Psycho” knows that it does not end well.

While Farmiga acknowledges that the characters are doomed she says “Bates Motel” wants the audience to root for them, “to hope against hope that maybe things turn out differently.”

Source

Mar
19
Posted by   Filed under Bates Motel, Interviews, MoviesComments Off

This exclusive video takes you deeper inside the episode, “First You Dream, Then You Die”. The actors give more details about their characters and the writers explain key elements about specific.

Mar
16
Posted by   Filed under Bates Motel, Events, MoviesComments Off

On the wave of promotion for Bates Motel, Vera was at Jay Leno last night. Enjoy the pics I got.

Gallery link:
TV Appearances & Interviews > TV Appearances & Interviews in 2013 > The Tonight Show with Jay Leno – March 15, 2013

Mar
15
Posted by   Filed under Bates Motel, Events, MoviesComments Off

Beautiful set of Bates Motel press conference in Beverly Hills of three days ago. Hoping to catch the HQs soon.

Gallery link:
Public Appearances > Events in 2013 > “Bates Motel” Press Conference

Mar
14
Posted by   Filed under Bates Motel, Interviews, MoviesComments Off

“Quite frankly,” Vera Farmiga says of Norma Bates, the iconic character she plays in the new, revisionist TV thriller Bates Motel, she didn’t think much about who Norman Bates’ mother was, or what happened to make her the person she became in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1960 film classic Psycho.

Norma Bates was, strictly speaking, not a character in suspense writer Robert Bloch’s original 1959 novel but rather an unseen presence.

Farmiga, with her arts-oriented upbringing and drama background — a stint with the American Conservatory Theatre and New York’s prestigious Barrow Group, followed by roles in the films Return to Paradise, Down to the Bone, The Departed, The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas, The Vintner’s Luck and an Academy Award-nominated turn opposite George Clooney in 2009’s Up in the Air — seemed an unlikely choice to play an emotionally abusive mother to a disturbed teenage boy in a TV thriller. But then Bates Motel is no ordinary TV thriller.

Farmiga approaches her roles from a theatrical, artistic vantage point, drawing on her arts-oriented upbringing and her affinity for independent film when considering a part.

She had seen Hitchcock’s Psycho years earlier — “I had done a whole comprehensive Hitchcock about a decade ago,” she says — but Norma Bates didn’t leave much of an impression.

Then she read the first three scripts of Bates Motel, and she saw a different side to the part. The more she immersed herself in the pages, the more she realized this was a role she was meant to play.

Bates Motel, conceived by Lost co-writer and producer Carlton Cuse and Friday Night Lights’ Kerry Ehrin, is a dark and moody, postmodern, updated-to-present-day psychological thriller, more in the vein of David Lynch and Twin Peaks than a typical TV clinker. Motel was filmed earlier this year in Aldergrove, B.C., filling in for moody, small-town middle America. It premieres Monday, March 18, on A&E.

Bates Motel was inspired by rather than adapted from the Hitchcock classic. It’s written as a contemporary examination of Norman Bates’ formative years, his relationship with his mother, and the emotional world they navigate, inside and outside the motel and hilltop house where they’ve lived since Norma Bates’ husband died. Norman is played in the series by 21-year-old UK actor Freddie Highmore, who counts Finding Neverland, The Golden Compass and The Spiderwick Chronicles among his film roles.

“It isn’t even necessarily Hitchcockian,” Farmiga explained in Los Angeles earlier this year, during a break from filming in Vancouver. “Yes, she’s a cool blond that, at the outset, appears very lovely but acts in a very animalistic way when she encounters danger. That’s Norma. For me, though, she was drawn more from Ibsen and Chekhov. She really was. I can equate her more to those kinds of heroines than Hitchcock. I didn’t think of Hitchcock’s Norma Bates and what that would mean to an audience.”

The postdated, modern-day setting and Bates Motel’s different rhythms and emotional beats make it seem unique and distinctive, Farmiga suggested, rather than a conventional remake of a time-honoured classic.

“We have a lot of bounce with this springboard to be inventive,” Farmiga said, “because we know nothing about her.”

Bates Motel takes a page from film noir, Farmiga added, as reflected in the first episode’s title: First You Dream, Then You Die. People have desires and dreams. Occasionally they do bad things in pursuit of those dreams, and there can be terrible consequences as a result.

“I went into this wanting to defend who this woman is,” Farmiga said. “In the early episodes I read, she was, to me, such a beautiful portrait of valiant maternity. I saw the challenge therein. To me, the story is a beautiful love letter between a mother and her son. That’s how I perceive the character. To me, it’s like the Edvard Munch painting of the Madonna. It’s really warped and it kind of exudes the scared and the profane. It’s just psychologically gripping. And that’s what I was drawn to with Norma. She’s a playground for an actress. The character’s riddled with contradiction. She’s as strong and tall as an oak, and as fragile as a butterfly, and everything in between that I admire in female characters I come across — resilience and passion and intellect. And, at the same time, she’s an absolute train wreck.

“Bad things happen to her, but in her perseverance there’s a lot of strength.”

Bates Motel premieres Monday, March 18, on A&E at 10 ET/7 PT.

Source


  • Current Projects

    Bates Motel - 2013/2015
    Vera as Norma Louise Bates
    Big city lawyer Hank Palmer returns to his childhood home where his father, the town's judge, is suspected of murder. Hank sets out to discover the truth and, along the way, reconnects with his estranged family.
    Genre: Drama
    Photos - IMDB - Official Site

    The Conjuring 2: The Enfield Poltergeist - 2015
    Vera as Lorraine Warren
    Not yet released
    Genre: Horror
    Photos - IMDB

    The Locals - 2015
    Vera as Lillian Goldberg
    The Locals is a comedic love story set in the Bronx about two three generational families; one Jewish, one Italian. Ironically, these families as most Jews and Italians have so much in common; love of the gab, love of food, they talk with their hands, they feed you with guilt and fill your hearts with cultural humor that somehow bridges the divide between all cultures and all generations. A New York based Romeo and Juliet with modern a twist that harks to the hilarity of Moonstruck and the lovable absurdity of familial dysfunction in Little Miss Sunshine.
    Genre: Comedy
    Photos - IMDB

    Facing The Wind
    Vera as unknown
    Bob Rowe is a model husband and father whose profound psychic unraveling leads him to commit an unimaginable act of violence and his subsequent search for redemption.
    Genre: Drama
    Photos - IMDB

    Prima
    Vera as unknown
    Chubby Jesse Urchin shocks everyone except her ex-dancer mother Corinne when she is accepted into the prestigious Battleboro School for Dancers. As Corinne struggles to acclimate to her posh stomping grounds of old, Jesse learns that to get to the top she must kill or be killed when she suddenly finds herself immersed in the cutthroat world of prima ballerinas.
    Genre: Comedy
    Photos - IMDB

    The Geography of Hope
    Vera as unknown
    A 1970s-set story centered on two crooks (Eckhart and Harris) hiding out in Baja, Mexico and their experiences with several American women.
    Genre: Crime | Drama
    Photos - IMDB

    The Judge - 2014
    Vera as Samantha
    Big city lawyer Hank Palmer returns to his childhood home where his father, the town's judge, is suspected of murder. Hank sets out to discover the truth and, along the way, reconnects with his estranged family.
    Genre: Drama
    Photos - IMDB - Official Site


  • Partner Sites

    Freddie HighmoreFreddie HighmoreNicola PeltzOlivia CookeTaissa Farmiga

    Powered by Affiliationally


  • Quoting Vera


  • Elite & Top Sites

    Angelina JolieAnna KendrickAsa ButterfieldBoyd HolbrookDaniel CraigEmily VancampEmma StoneHilary SwankIsabelle FuhrmanJake GyllenhaalJake GyllenhaalJennifer LawrenceJoel McHaleJuliette BinocheKate BeckinsaleKate WinsletLana ParrillaMadeleine StoweNicola PeltzOlivia CookePiper PeraboRupert FriendSharon Stone

    Powered by Affiliationally



    View all | Become one

  • About the site

    Owner: Claudia
    Previous Owners: Chanel, Kimberly, Maria
    Contact: form
    Since: February 2006
    Currently browsing


  • Disclaimer

    © (2011). Vera Farmiga Online | vera-farmiga.com is a non-profit fan site. We are no way affiliated with Vera, her family, management or friends. All graphics and original content are being used under the Fair Copyright Law 107 and belong to Vera Farmiga Online. Other images and texts belong to their respective owners. No copyright infringement intended. This is an unofficial website.